We use cookies to improve your experience, some are essential for the operation of this site.

The Silverdale Hoard

The Silverdale Hoard
The Silverdale Hoard
Details
19
The Silverdale Hoard
This spectacular collection of Viking silver was discovered in mid September 2011. It is one of the largest collection of Viking silver found to date and was unearthed by a keen metal detectorist near to the village of Silverdale in North Lancashire. It had been buried for more than 1,000 years. Most of the pieces were contained in a lead 'pouch'. The survival of this container is, in itself, a rare occurrence that adds significance to the find.
The Silverdale Hoard comprises silver items including arm-rings, coins, ingots and chopped up pieces of silver known as 'hacksilver'. Alongside the lead pouch are a couple of fragments of lead and iron and one silver plated, base metal coin - a contemporary fake. The hoard is believed to have been deposited at approximately the same time as the Cuerdale Hoard, circa 905 AD.
The Silverdale Hoard was first shown on public display at Lancaster City Museum in 2013 and on display at the Museum of Lancashire in Preston until December 2014. Since then it has undergone careful conservation.
These images were taken at Lancaster and Preston in 2013-14 before the conservation work took place.
Added to these collections